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20120928
20121006
STATION
CSPAN 8
KQEH (PBS) 6
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
CNN 3
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 3
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English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
my parents were. i actually studied many religions. i love all religion. >> really. >> i do. i'm a voracious reader. i love people. i love to know what makes them tick and why they love what they love. >> to those who don't know anything about mormonism or the mormon church, what are the biggest misconceptions? >> i guess i'm running for president now. >> you do look quite presidential. >> thank you. >> you look like gina davis in "commander in chief." >> i think we need a woman in there. >> i agree. maybe it should be you. you and donny could do it together. >> oh, please, not him. >> are there misconceptions about the mormon church that annoy you? >> of course there are. there's misconceptions about every religion, don't you think? i've grown up with that. but no, it's like do we believe in the bible. absolutely we believe in the bible. the bible is our first -- the book of mormon is a second witness only that jesus is the christ. it's a second record that documents that he was the son of god. that's what we believe. i'm not telling people what to believe. that's what i belie
is two different things. >> where do you get a crazy religion like that? i've never heard of that religion. >> it's how you answer the question. >> that makes a lot of sense. i don't get shot. the other guy does but that's my religion. let's go back to you. what do you think is going to be the biggest fight? >> the biggest fight? boy, good question. i dobt know that there's going to be a fight. >> what are you going to actually do with all of these taxes? >> well, here's the thing about tonight. michael and i were talking about this tonight. we don't know -- either of these guys could screw up tonight. and so we don't know that they are going to be -- there is going to be this correct debate and everybody is going to do what they ought to do. >> do you think they will stay careful? >> i think they are conscious and weary at first but either mitt romney or barack obama, just because of the people they are, either one is capable of giving that wrong body language, that wrong -- >> okay. i'd be nervous if i were romney if we're 15 minutes in and it seems boring, i'd begin to
is not always pro-science. >> in a lot of ways, science like religion, has been co-oped by politics and is used to strans an agenda by both sides. how can we retain a faith in science when even science journalists can't be trusted anymore it seems? >> well, i think that sometimes -- you are right that sometimes science journalists can fall prey to hype and fall prey to political biases. the best way to avoid that is to have people more engaged in actual reading of like scientific journals or read more addition read the news arm of, for instance "nature." if people read more scientific journals and get the general gist of what a scientific article says, you can go right to the source and learn right from the source and read a wide variety of viewpoints in science. that's what we do at real clear science. we have as many viewpoints as possible. >> alex, i wouldn't make the claim that everyone on the left is pro-science and everyone on the right is anti-science. certainly you have written about this. people on the left have pushed the idea of a link between vaccines and autism, and i think that's
barack obama was hurt by the statement about clinging to guns and religion, same dynamic. what does he believe behind closed doors about you? and that's the other piece of that that's effective. you can identify with those people on the screen. and you can say even if you do pay federal income taxes, that was really an attack about people like me. i think that's the most effective ad the obama campaign has run. >> do you think voters expect honesty from the candidates? >> we know that voters tell us that they don't like attack in politics. and they don't like deception in politics. we know that attack can move voters. and we know that deception can move voters who aren't informed and and anchored in the facts. but we also know that voters value honesty and we know it through indirect evidence. we know that when the republicans successfully lodge the charge in 2000 that al gore wasn't trustworthy, and they did it in part with an ad that played on his statement about playing a role in the creation of the internet, that it hurt perceptions of his trustworthiness and honesty and that it fa
believe. when the question someone's taste in art, it is personal and probing than politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say, you got that? >> "60 minutes" with morley safer. sunday at 8:00 p.m. on c-span's "q&a." cracks up next, a look at the immediate impact that last night's debate had on voters. this is about 90 minutes. ♪ >> good morning, everyone. i would like to invite you to take your seat. we will go ahead and get started. thank you for joining us on this thursday. thank you to everyone who is joining us on the live stream and those watching on c-span to and the voice of america. for those of you i do not know and have not met, my name is victoria. it is my pleasure to welcome you on behalf of all my colleagues to this wonderful discussion. before we get started, a few items to give you a sense of what is coming. charlie will be up in a moment. he will give us is take on last night's debate. guests, be joined by two ga who will also offer their perspectives on the debate and the upcoming election. we are grateful to all o
, it is more personal, more probing than politics, religion, sexual preference. there is something that goes to the very soul when you say "you bought that?" >> morley safer of cbs on walter cronkite and journalism today. "washington journal" continues. host: we are back with our "america by the numbers" segment. the overall unemployment rate has dropped percentage -- 7.8%. if you look to those sectors, manufacturing is what we're focusing on -- is not doing as robustly as other sectors. manufacturing employment edged down 16,000 jobs on net. the jobs in computer and electronic parts and printing and related activities. we will listen to the candidates and come back oand talk about their proposals for the manufacturing sector. let's start with president obama. [video clip] >> what i talked about last night was eight new economic patriotism, and patriotism that is rooted in the belief that growing our economy begins with a strong, thriving middle-class. that means we export more jobs -- export more products and we outsource fewer jobs. over the last three years, we came together to reinvent a
. there's different people, there's different races. there's different religions, and they don't want to accept that. they don't want to change their mindset. so, in the end, they campaign about the media coverage being biased, but when they look at it, the media coverage is not reflecting -- i mean, it's small, because their views are small. i think the media adequately reflects what the larger part of society feels. host: when you hear that somebody is a fox news watcher, do you immediately assume or think of them as potentially racist? caller: i do. because fox news, that's all -- i wish they knew people. i wish they knew other views. you know, the way they bash president obama, i mean, if he were white, you know, it would be different. i think they would look at it differently. i just don't think that -- i just think they're narrow-minded. they probably don't think they're racist, you know, but it's just how they put things out there, how they portray different groups and different people. you know, for instance, the muslims, they're just bad people. i'm a muslim, you know? why wo
sterilization and the morning after pill because they consider to be an assault on their religion as this. when the president did not withdraw those regulations but, in fact, double down the, he awoke it giant in america called the roman catholic church. he is going to rue the day that he did that command of tell you why. there is a great myth in western storytelling. dates back to the eliot. the super hero who was asleep. you wonder where that super hero is. achilles will not come out because he is mad at the others. rage. he only comes out after he has been threatened. dealt with. and the room because the church basically left the field of politics in 1968 and has not been effectively energized in politics for 40 years. they are now back. they're led by cardinal timothy dolan. the ships up and down this country laypeople up and down this country, religious up and down this country who believe that the obama administration rightly has leveled a direct attack on their ability to be catholic. that is not going to pass unnoticed in states like ohio, michigan, pennsylvania where the catholic vote
the mormons out of the country. we are a target country when it comes to an unusual religion. host: this is following up with your definition about abortion rights. [laughter] guest: never understand why this is a hard concept to grasp. we want enough government so people are not killed in the womb. that doesn't mean we want the government to make this go through 18 hours of procedures to change the moawning in front of the store. host: 114,000 jobs created in september and the unemployment rate going down, 7.8%. yet it's still higher than the day obama took office. that excludes all the people that have given up looking for work. it is still higher than the day he took office. host: with the trend going down, how do you think it will play politically? guest: 23 million people are out of work. the country is suffering. maybe they do not know on capitol hill. people know that people are not working are working at far less jobs than they had a few years ago. we have to get the country going again. host: teresa in florida. caller: you just about talked out the clock. most of us heard
, in the first amendment's provision of free speech, freedom of religion, and the founders presupposed and informed electorate, and an electorate which is purchase of a tory, not sitting on the sidelines. again, echoing the panel here, i get involved. please join me in thanking our panel. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> when nations cheat in trade, and china has cheated, i will finally do something the president has not been willing to do, which is labeled them a currency manipulator. >> we brought more trade cases against china in one term than the previous administration did in two terms. by the way, we have been winning those cases. >> wednesday, president obama and mitt romney meet in their first presidential debate. watch and engage with c-span with our lives debate preview at 7:00 p.m. eastern. on c-span, both candidates on the screen for the entire debate. following, your reaction, calls, e-mails, and tweets. >> coming up on c-span, journalist howard kurtz looks at the role of social a
a security and political theory meaning that terrorism has no nation and no religion, and it is a common thread regionally and internationally, and it requires a necessity, a common effort to fight terrorism within the frame along with what we do to have the cooperation of combating terrorism with more than 40 nations, and that included all aspects in intelligence exchange, activities, and how best to combat and detour and rendition and to have bilateral meetings with those nations, and this theory that's been adopted by the yes , ma'amny -- yemen government comes along the understanding of terrorism, and today, it is not -- not a specific problem to nations, but it is rather international threat and on the political, social, economic levels. this will reflect the fears and realist threats provided by the ways and means of terrorists diversified and are transnational. there are blood and lives lost. we are still suffering from terrorism, and we paid a lot with blood and life and many of the public institutions and privately owned and it affected the tourism and now most of the hotels in
religion and research institute at pew about the white working class voters. they're roughly split between the president and romney in everywhere but the south where there's a huge gap. the one region where white working class voters are supporting the president over mitt romney is in the midwest, is in your region. what is -- what's the source of that? is that the auto rescue? is it the out of touch plutocratic heir of mitt romney? >> it's yes and yes. higher rates of unionization among white working class voters. it's the auto rescue but it's the part of the auto rescue especially for nonworking voters that are rarely talked about in national media. you have insight that most don't have on this, chris, i think, and it's the supply chain. tier 2 and 3 and tier 4 supply chain auto companies. the uaw members that work at the jeep plant in toledo that put together the wrangler, the liberty, and the uaw workers in youngstown that put together the cruise that wouldn't be there in all likelihood without the auto rescue, they're already vote are for obama, voting for me, voting for democrats bec
in art, it is more personal, mo prayer than in the politics, religion, preference. it is just something that goes to the very soul when you say, you bought that? >> this is the first parish church in new brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of "uncle tom's cabin" that in many ways the story began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23. teachers do, by her account, sought a vision of uncle tom being with to death. now, uncle tom is you probably know, is the title charactercome to hear of her 1852 novel, "uncle tom's cabin." "uncle tom's cabin" was written very much as a protest novel to the slave block of which mandated in 1850 that anyone in the north, where of the abolitionists live, if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill that was seen as kind of a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. it said that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say the same, i am a person can hear you beecher stowe, name against slavery as a much of new england.
to drive the mormons out of the country. we are a target country when it comes to an unusual religion. host: this is following up with your definition about abortion rights. [laughter] guest: never understand why this is a hard concept to grasp. we want enough government so people are not killed in the womb. that doesn't mean we want the government to make this go through 18 hours of procedures to change the awning in front of the store. host: 114,000 jobs created in september and the unemployment rate going down, 7.8%. guest: yet it's still higher than the day obama took office. that excludes all the people that have given up looking for work. it is still higher than the day he took office. host: with the trend going down, how do you think it will play politically? guest: 23 million people are out of work. the country is suffering. maybe they do not know on capitol hill. people know that people are not working are working at far less jobs than they had a few years ago. we have to get the country going again. host: teresa in florida. caller: you just about talked out the clock. most of us h
, yeah. >> why is it? why is it so special? >> it discusses god from many aspects, religion from many aspects, morality, getting carried away with god is as offensive as denying god. >> i was going to ask you personally. you obviously have a problem with people proselytizing and getting in your face about god, but do you believe in god? >> i haven't made up my mind. >> you got time. >> yeah. i don't think so. >> you've got time, my man. >> yeah. >> in your absence from the stage, and you've been so successful in everything you've chosen to do, did you realize how much you may have missed the instant feedback from a live audience? >> well, i would like to say yes because this play means so much to me, but i've been touring for three years with a one man show of "fdr" and i know i don't look like him, i don't sound like him but, boy, i love to preach him. >> i bet. who are you politically? through time, because -- >> they would be too liberal for you. >> well who are they? >> you'd probably be surprised. >> not for me. >> i know. >> well, hell you could go with carl marx with her. >> oh
are engaged in war and we adopted a political theory meaning that terrorism has no religion and it is a common threat regionally and internationally. it requires an necessitates a common effort to fight terrorism within the frame, along with what we did to cement the corporation in combating terrorism with more than 40 nations, and that included all aspects in intelligence exchange, activities, and how best to combat and deter and have a bilateral meeting with those nations. this theory that has been adopted by the yemeni government comes with the understanding of terrorism and today it is not an isolated problem to a specific nation. it is, rather, an international threat from the political, social, economic levels. this will reflect the fierce willingham-- fears that the threats are diversified and transnational. there are lives that they're been lost. we have suffered and we are still suffering from terrorism and we have played a lot with blood and life. many of the public institutions, and it affected tourism. and now most of the hotels in yemen are closed. there are no foreigners at all.
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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